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MODY diabetes?

Question:
My husband has been recently diagnosed with diabetes. He is 33 years old and not overweight. At first he was diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes then diagnosed as type 1 because of weight and age. At his last appointment his doctor said he had diabetes, (Mature onset diabetes of the young). He is currently taking 2 mg Glimiperide and 500 mg metformin 2 times a day. Does anyone have any suggestions on this form of diabetes and what it is?
Answers:
Welcome Joei,
is a form of .5 diabetes in which adults have an autoimmune disease which has a slower onset than diabetes.
is a post about .5 that also has several links to . The links will do a much better job of explaining but for the really quick and dirty it's caused by one of several genetic changes that produce the disease. Your husband probably has a strong family history of diabetes and/or . Check out those links for some more details.
Answers:
Originally Posted by Stump86 Welcome Joei,
is a form of .5 diabetes in which adults have an autoimmune disease which has a slower onset than diabetes.
is a post about .5 that also has several links to . The links will do a much better job of explaining but for the really quick and dirty it's caused by one of several genetic changes that produce the disease. Your husband probably has a strong family history of diabetes and/or . Check out those links for some more details. I think the first part refers to , not . is not an autoimmune disease.
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That's right isn't autoimmune it's genetic, my mistake!
Check out David's post, I don't know what I'm talking about
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Mody?
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I don't know about , I'm learning about or type 1.5. I don't know if they're one in the same. I'm 35 and was just diagnosed this past June with type 1 but I'm thinking I'm probably type 1.5. My doctor told me that they were one in the same. For me they put me right on insulin, a lot of LADAs get started on pills and then eventually have to go on insulin. To better preserve what you have left of your beta cells you should probably go right to the insulin and get off the pills .
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MODY vs LADA vs Late T1 or T1 1/2
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This very interesting discussion should be of great use not only to us, the patients, but also to the providers, since this is obviously such a complicated subject. Here's my saga, which might provide some insight on how difficult it can be to these things, particularly in the early days, correctly.
It all began in 2000, when I had a devil of a time getting used to a new for my glasses. Got over that. Then more problems about October 2001, when I got a sinus infection that just WOULD NOT, despite three rounds of antibiotics and two rounds of prednisone, go away. In December I changed docs, went in for a physical, plus fixing my sinus infection, and got THE WORD.
My first , in December 2001, was , even though I was normal weight, low cholesterol, low BP, no thirst or other obvious symptoms. "You're diabetic." The notion that I was diabetic just didn't compute with anyone who knew me, including me. But the AIC doesn't lie. I got by just fine on Metformin for almost three years.
Second--and very reluctantly made-- , as a generic T 1 1/2 came after about three years, when the Metformin wouldn't do the trick any longer. I knew many 's proceed to insulin, but usually not for quite a long time, and that the time can be extended by preserving what native insulin production you have left. Having to go to insulin after only three years was quite a shock, but the made that call, and told me we could string out the time until my poor beta cells pooped out completely with a "second honeymoon" if we started insulin early. I was feeling so lousy at the time, anything looked like any improvement. He put me on Lantus, only. No one WANTS to take the first "shot" but it was more than worth the effort. I perked right up afterward.
Third , as a probable (this is the autoimmune version, as I understand it), came about a year after that, although it didn't seem to make much difference in the treatment.
Somewhere between 3rd and 4th I was switched from Lantus to Humulin N by the , bedtime only, but why I never was told or have forgotten why.
When the Humulin N alone wasn't holding, early this summer, I was switched (for the most miserable summer of my life--this one) to a combination of Humulin N twice a day, I think on the theory that I could avoid taking some rapid acting with each meal. Had I realized that this was the intent, I would have said "Hey, I don't care, and this regimen isn't working, anyway."
Constant crashes, and barn burner highs after even the most modest of lunches, so I had to take the Humalog anyway. Humulin N wasn't doing the trick, and I was taking for me a LOT with major glucose consequences, all of them bad, PLUS I started gaining weight. AND I had to take the Humalog as well, which just compounded my troubles.
Fourth came in 2007 as more likely a (which I gather is the genetic version) came this fall, with a switch to Levemir only plus a Humalog booster with each main meal. I now take HALF as much insulin as previously, even though I use many more injections. I haven't had a crash (except for the time I took too much in anticipation of a dessert that was too disgusting to eat) and relatively few "highs" (generally when I'm not feeling so hot anyway.) On the plus side, three pounds fell off the first week.
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type 1.5 usually had the GAD anitbody, while does not and there are many forms of from what i have read. I have been trying to research on . If anyone has some good info would be appreciated
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I thought was normally diagnosed in childhood?
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Originally Posted by blondy2061h I thought was normally diagnosed in childhood? That's what they used to think, until they started finding forms that can be so "mild" that people don't notice and never get diagnosed, or wouldn't have been, until the researchers came along. Because people with can have normal fasting glucose, they might not get diagnosed even if they suspected something.
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thanks. From what i have read, it can still appear up to 55 years old.
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